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Idea Makers: Personal Perspectives on the Lives & Ideas of Some Notable People #2020

Idea Makers: Personal Perspectives on the Lives & Ideas of Some Notable People By Stephen Wolfram Idea Makers Personal Perspectives on the Lives Ideas of Some Notable People This book of thoroughly engaging essays from one of today s most prodigious innovators provides a uniquely personal perspective on the lives and achievements of a selection of intriguing figures from
  • Title: Idea Makers: Personal Perspectives on the Lives & Ideas of Some Notable People
  • Author: Stephen Wolfram
  • ISBN: 9781579550035
  • Page: 167
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Idea Makers: Personal Perspectives on the Lives & Ideas of Some Notable People By Stephen Wolfram This book of thoroughly engaging essays from one of today s most prodigious innovators provides a uniquely personal perspective on the lives and achievements of a selection of intriguing figures from the history of science and technology Weaving together his immersive interest in people and history with insights gathered from his own experiences, Stephen Wolfram gives anThis book of thoroughly engaging essays from one of today s most prodigious innovators provides a uniquely personal perspective on the lives and achievements of a selection of intriguing figures from the history of science and technology Weaving together his immersive interest in people and history with insights gathered from his own experiences, Stephen Wolfram gives an ennobling look at some of the individuals whose ideas and creations have helped shape our world today Contents includes biographical sketches of Richard Feynman Kurt Godel Alan Turing John von Neumann George Boole Ada Lovelace Gottfried Leibniz Benoit Mandelbrot Steve Jobs Marvin Minsky Russell Towle Bertrand Russell Alfred Whitehead Richard Crandall Srinivasa Ramanujan Solomon Golomb
    Idea Makers: Personal Perspectives on the Lives & Ideas of Some Notable People By Stephen Wolfram
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      Stephen Wolfram

    About "Stephen Wolfram"

    1. Stephen Wolfram

      Stephen Wolfram s parents were Jewish refugees who emigrated from Germany to England in the 1930s Wolfram s father Hugo was a textile manufacturer and novelist Into a Neutral Country and his mother Sybil was a professor of philosophy at the University of Oxford He has a younger brother, Conrad Wolfram is married to a mathematician and has four children.He was educated at Eton College, but claimed to be bored and left it prematurely in 1976 He entered St John s College, Oxford at age 17 but found lectures awful , and left in 1978 without graduating He received a Ph.D in particle physics from the California Institute of Technology at age 20, 8 joined the faculty there and received one of the first MacArthur awards in 1981, at age 21.Wolfram presented a talk at the TED conference in 2010, and he was named Speaker of the Event for his 2012 talk at SXSW In 2012 he became a fellow of the American Mathematical Society.

    717 Comments

    1. Stephen Wolfram didn t want to wait until some journalist write a book about how his work extends or even completes the work of past luminaries So he wrote it.Which is actually not a problem For one thing, it might be the case that Wolfram s results in different areas of research really extend the field of computational mathematics or even define the basis of a computational model of the universe Who can really know.What matters is that the book is enjoyable and offers a unique approach to life [...]


    2. Stunningly boring and overloaded with Wolfram s self admiration.The book is also plagued with repetetiveness words Mathematica , Cellular automata , Universal computation , and, of course, Wolfram flickered fast enough to give a poor reader a seizure.Perhaps reading these essays one at a time would be somewhat okay, but compiling them into a book was a fatal decision.


    3. I think it s the fact that wolfram himself could and should be one of the characters of his book, that makes this collection of eulogies to the likes of Ada Lovelace, Solomon Golomb, Ramanujan and Marvin Minsky read in such a powerful and entertaining way.Idea makers has quite an interesting mixture of personal anecdotes feynman, jobs, minsky, etc and detail historical recollections of some of the worlds greatest doers.


    4. This is a series of short biographies of various men and one woman who made significant contributions to math computer science Unfortunately the book has two major flaws First the author Wolfram of Mathematica and Wolfram Alpha inserts himself into nearly every biography While this is sometimes appropriate, often it is not e.g Think what famous mathematician of two hundred years ago could have done if he only had had access to my tool, Mathematica Second the discussions of specific computer tool [...]


    5. IDEA MAKERS is a fun read about many famous figures many of whom were mathematicians Some of them the author met, but many have been gone for years The author is clear, right from the start, that this isn t any type of systematic overview of great men of science Rather, it s his thoughts on people that have caught his interest for many different reasons.Notice that the subtitle is Personal Perspectives on the Lives and Ideas of Some Notable People So, although this book has many discussions on m [...]


    6. Idea Makers was an enjoyable read It gives a unique perspective on a number of notable thinkers in the fields of mathematics and computer science It shows how these towering figures worked relentlessly for at least two hundred years, if not , just to come up with a mechanical analytical machine essentially a primitive calculator , a precursor to today s modern computers We are indeed standing on the shoulders of giants However, having used the author s outstanding creation, an engineering mathem [...]



    7. I recently had the pleasure of reading a new release from the desk of Stephen Wolfram Idea Makers The book is structured as a collection of biographical blog posts about scientific luminaries and notables from the fields of the author s interest including physics, computer science, and mathematics It is a good rule of thumb to filter one s reading material based on the Lindy effect any book that is still talked about 10 years after publishing may only then known to be worth picking up I recommen [...]


    8. This book is a compilation of blog posts Stephen Wolfram of Mathematica fame has written about various scientific personages, either as obituaries or on account of his general interest in them The pieces are of very uneven length, and of the 15 I found three to be of interest to me The essay about Ada Lovelace goes into the historical records to really pin down, factually, what contributions she made to Charles Babbage s early computer, the Analytical Engine it was not so much as his programmer [...]


    9. This book captures the views of the author on the lives and work of some of the best innovators The author has done an excellent job in selecting the innovators He has also done good amount of research on the work and lives of the persons Some of his insights are good.But there are a few problems with the narrative First it is a personal perspective and some of the views are very biased and not appropriate for wider audience The content is full of self admiration of the author and his work Often [...]


    10. An understanding of computational mathematicsStephen Wolfram is that rare individual who possesses the insights to understand physics, mathematics, and business His flagship product Mathematica possesses attributes that allow those who learn it well to understand deeper insights to physical phenomena His book, Idea Makers, is a digestible form of some of the ideas that allowed Mathematica to be one of the most powerful computational tools on the market.The book, although slow at the start, deliv [...]


    11. Have you ever wondered what various famous mathematicians would have thought of Mathematica Or asked yourself how their work anticipated Wolfram Alpha Or mused on how they had a rough inkling of what Wolfram was getting at in A New Kind of Science Well, if you haven t wondered these things, rest assured Stephen Wolfram has, and he will tell you These stories work way better as blog posts by someone showing off his legitimately very impressive software But as a book Nah.


    12. This is an interesting book describing fascinating people However, Wolfram consistently compares each one to himself and points out ways that he had made progress or the wrong paths they took causing them to oh so closely miss making his own discoveries I think Wolfram is a smart guy with good ideas but these repeated interjections are intrusive.


    13. I ordered this book back then once it got released and what I like about the author in this specific work is making audacious inspections in the works and accomplishments of renowned figures of Science and drawing the boundary lines according to his own assessment and judgement of the limits of knowledge and achievements they have reached in comparison to one another.


    14. Wonderful Steve got locked down too easily, funny how people are.Great piece on Ramanujan and proofs Wolfram pushes his NKS a little too much, must be something special



    15. It was an okay read, Wolfram has some pretty grandiose visions, and opinions about his work that might appear as delusions of grandeur.



    16. Most of the critics seem to have stopped reading before the semicolon These are personal perspectives Think less Isaacson or McCullough and Vidal or Buckley Jr.


    17. Although I love his products, I am not a huge fan of Wolfram, so I read this book mainly because of the excellent choice of the people described, like Ramanujan, Feynman, etc Even though there are no big ideas in it, the book is worth reading My main critic is that the author could save us from all the advertising of Wolfram s product Mathematica, Alpha, his f ing cellular automata, or even himself.Here are some takeaways Peace of mind is the most important prerequisite for creative work Feynman [...]


    18. If one can discount for the huge ego and monomania of the author, the reader can find some interesting and informative connection between the characters described, besides personal biographical notes in most of the cases Unfortunately Wolfram considers his own products the apex of the whole civilization, and does not waste any occasion to remind the reader For every character that he is interested in, one hardly can avoid to think that Wolfram is pityful, and considers himself superior because h [...]



    19. I enjoyed this, but you have to get past the fairly frequent plugs for Mathematic and Wolfram s other products This happens in nearly every article and sometimes multiple times This book is a collection, and the articles may originally have been on say a Wolfram or Mathematic blog or journal or whatever, so that may have been appropriate, but in this context, it just feels very uneven He never once mentions anyone else s product or work in these cases, so it feels pretty self centered towards M [...]


    20. A collection of Wolfram eulogies for people he knew and ruminations on historic luminaries The Story s Story states the book reads like a convo after a couple of drinks I agree Based on the foci of his attention, I feel I ve learned something about Wolfram as I would when someone s had a couple of drinks When Wolfram geeks out about historical figure s like Lebiniz he writes for a nerdy audience but takes the time to explain some of the math I def learned about signal shifts and there use in cel [...]


    21. I had some issues with this book Firstly, there is a typesetting problem There are many photos of pages of text that are clearly meant to be read, but because they are thumbnail size, are literally unreadable I suspect that in an e book one can zoom in on these, but that is not helpful when they are on paper.As other readers point out, even though this book is ostensibly biographies of others, it is also a lot about Mathematica and Wolfram He manages to get in some choice autobiography in every [...]


    22. A remarkable collection of personal notes about people and ideas that have been foundational to computer science The book is semi autobiographical The unifying theme is the author himself but he shines the light on many different characters across a very long span of time The descriptions carry a warm admiration The context and significance of various accomplishments are described The author frequently speculates about how much each subject could have accomplished.The book emphasizes the role o [...]


    23. This book is a collection of short essay length biographies of several subjects, each with some relation to Stephen Wolfram s work in the intersection of math and computer science I was personally quite pleased with the curation which includes the world famous, the obscure, and some surprises For better or worst, the essays tend to veer into Wolfram s own life and protracted discussions of his own work and results.


    24. Here we have Wolfram s heroes A bunch of remarkable people whose work and life inspired his own achievements The motivation is connect breakthroughs to lives sharing a deeper understanding of the motivations behind great contributions to science Of course, he knitted everything together referring to Mathematica, Wolfram Alpha and the New Kind of Science Hey, his list includes Feynman, Turing, Mandelbrot, Russell and Leibniz to cite 5 out of 16 plus unusual insights on mathematical concepts.


    25. Writing is surely not one of Steven Wolfram s strengths Albeit the terrible writing style, and the annoyingly frequent mentioning of Mathematica and Wolfram Alpha, this is a good summary of some of the most notable people that shaped modern mathematics and computer science If you can blend out the self advertisement, it s a really decent book


    26. What could possibly go wrong in a short book with collection of articles about prominent people in mathematics and computing A lot The repeated mentions of Mathematica Automata throughout the book turned me off I don t think this was even supposed to be a book The chapter about Ada Lovelace, the only woman in this book, was really well researched and written.


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